Mercedes-AMG GT review

Category: Sports car

Section: Interior

Available fuel types:petrol
Star rating
Mercedes-AMG GT 2020 RHD dashboard
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RRP £98,930What Car? Target Price from£97,970
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Interior

The interior layout, fit and finish

The interior of the GT looks almost as dramatic as the outside, thanks to a bulbous centre console that fences the driver off from the passenger. Material quality is sadly lacking, though.

Some of the plastic panels are lightweight – the stability control panel on the GT R is flimsier than an OJ Simpson defence plea – and the faux-metal trim (actually plastic) on the centre console, is seriously low-rent for such a high-value car. Oh yes, and the entry-level version comes with plastic 'leather' and fake suede seat trim. McLaren, Porsche and Audi all do it much, much better.

On the centre console, you’ll find a myriad of buttons and switches to change the character of the car; among other things, you can adjust the responsiveness of the accelerator, the speed of gearshifts and the loudness of the exhaust.

Fortunately, it’s not as complicated as it looks at first glance, but the oddly positioned gear selector – positioned closer to your elbow than your hand – makes swapping from park to drive or reverse an act of contortion. 

The infotainment system is standard Mercedes fare. That means most major functions are easy enough to use, and it's a more up-to-date Mercedes interface than Aston Martin borrows for its DB11, with a larger, clearer 10.3in screen. That said, the touchpad controller isn't as intuitive as the rotary dial you get in a BMW M8 or Audi R8, and the software isn't as slick. Add the Plus Pack and you'll get an upgraded Burmester stereo with 10 speakers and 640 watts of power.

The standard digital dials, on a 12.3in screen, are easy to read and can be set-up in various styles. There’s also lots of seat and steering wheel adjustment to help drivers of different sizes get comfortable, and the seats themselves are supportive – especially the AMG bucket seats.

Rear visibility isn’t too bad, but you'll still be glad of the rear parking sensors and rear-view camera; the long bonnet – the end of which you can’t really see –means you’ll need to rely on the front parking sensors, too.

Mercedes-AMG GT 2020 RHD dashboard
Mercedes-AMG GT 2020 RHD front tracking
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